Is the Trek Fx 2 a Good Bike

Updated on June 26, 2022

A true hybrid, the Trek FX2 is one of my favourite bikes to ride. Even though it’s little and quick, it’s tough and long-lasting enough to be used on a light rail or even cross-country. The bike may not be suited for all-terrain riding or challenging technical routes, but its components make it more reliable and useful than the ordinary bike.

Some concessions in component quality and weight have been made in order to make this bike more affordable. A pleasant surprise is that a bike in this price bracket comes equipped with several higher-end components.

What Is a Trek Fx 2 Hybrid Fitness Bike?

When you first start riding a bike, you’ll have to familiarise yourself with a wide range of bike styles. You’ll find conventional road bikes with drop handlebars and light frames on the left. Full-suspension mountain bikes are on the right. The Trek FX 2 is a cross between a treadmill and a stationary bike.

Instead of drop bars like a road bike, a fitness hybrid’s handlebars are flat like a mountain bike’s. Lightweight frames are also available for fitness bikes, just like for road bikes. Wider tyres on hybrid bikes bring them closer to the mountain bike category. There are 700x35c tyres on the Trek FX 2 Disc (disc brakes, not rim breaks). Despite their small size and light weight, these tyres are capable of coping with a variety of road conditions, from pavement to gravel.

When a bike has a fitness component, it was constructed with efficiency in mind. The lack of a front suspension allows for weight savings. Riding on the road is made easier by the thinner tyres. The Trek Dual Sport 2 has bigger tyres and a front suspension, while a hybrid bike does not. Speed and efficiency are sacrificed to make it more comfortable over more rough terrain.

Features and Benefits of the Trek FX Series

The Trek FX 2 Disc’s brakes are a standout feature. Hydraulic disc brakes are an essential part of any Trek FX 2 review. The bicycle industry has undergone considerable advances in brakes in the previous few years. There was a time when rim brakes were the norm on the road. Hydraulic disc brakes, like as those used on Trek FX series bikes, provide the best braking power.

Tektro flat mount disc brakes with 160mm rotors are standard equipment on the FX 2. These brakes aren’t even close to the best on the market. Although they are effective for stopping your bike, they aren’t the best. Since moving to a new city, I’ve experienced multiple near misses, such as when a car pulls out in front of me or a major deviation in the road comes up. On more than one occasion, the brakes saved my life. When compared to bikes purchased from a large box retailer, hydraulic disc brakes will be the most visible improvement.

What Kind Of Bike Is The Trek FX 2?

It is a fitness/hybrid bike, and the Trek FX 2 is one. Hybrid bikes are basically any type of bicycle that doesn’t fit into a certain category like a road, mountain or cruiser type bicycle. In contrast to regular road bikes, fitness hybrids have flat handlebars instead of the drop bars found on most road cycles.

There are a variety of terrains that fitness hybrid bikes can be used on. In addition to being wonderful for commuting, flat bars may be used to create a fantastic gravel bike. It’s a bike that can do it all, but it’s not the best at any one thing.

My Trek FX 2 had two sets of wheels for a long time. The OEM wheelset came with 35mm tyres, so I swapped them out for some slightly more aggressive 32mm road tyres that I had on a set of 40mm gravel tyres. After a while, tyre upgrades weren’t enough, so I began to purchase newer bikes. Despite this, I’m still attached to my Trek FX 2.

Frame

The Trek FX2’s frame is a basic hybrid bike design. A lightweight aluminium alloy is used to keep the price down while yet delivering good durability and a lighter weight than most steel cycles, making this bike ideal for those on a budget.

Internally, the frame is also routed. On a low-cost bike like this, it’s a good perk to have because it protects wiring for the braking and shifting systems, extending the life of each component.

Pre-drilled accessory mounting holes, including front and rear racks, are also included. As a result, there are no fitted accessories on the bike. That makes it simple to customise the bike, but it also means that you need budget more than the bike’s purchase price to get it ready to ride.

This is a decent option if you don’t plan on adding any other accessories.

The FX 2’s huge frame weighs only 26 pounds, which is remarkable. A touch heavy for a road bike, but light enough for a mountain bike, demonstrates the versatility of this bike.

Suspension System

In terms of suspension, this bike falls short. In large part as a result of the Trek FX 2’s lack of substantial suspension. However, while the steel fork does a fair job of absorbing hits and maintaining a smooth ride, it lacks the travel space or even an air buffer to help absorb larger impacts.

This isn’t a big deal with a hybrid bike. Steel forks combined with decent wheels and a comfortable saddle will give you a comfortable ride on nearly any terrain this bike is meant to tackle.

Wheel

This model’s wheels are likewise very typical. The rims are composed of aluminium alloy and have a superb double-walled structure. That implies that they are relatively light and sturdy, but also quieter than your typical carbon rims.

On this bike, the six-bolt hubs aren’t anything exceptional and don’t add any flare. In the end, most hybrid users will be satisfied with their performance and durability.

Both the spokes and their diameter are quite standard. Long-lasting enough to withstand light off-road use, but lacking in any eye-catching design cues.

To conclude, let’s consider the rubber. The tyres on this vehicle are almost all hybrid. They have a decent amount of tread, but they’re clearly geared for speed rather than traction.

It’s sensible and economical to begin by updating the tyres on your hybrid bike so that it may perform better as a mountain or cross-country machine.

Gear

While entry-level Trek brakes are sometimes lacking in features, the FX 2 continues Trek’s tradition of high-quality components and a well-designed gear system. While the gearing on the FX 2 is more limited than on many Trek cycles, and even more so than on many hybrid bike models, Shimano is still the manufacturer of choice.

It’s wonderful to see a bike in this price bracket with a Shimano drivetrain, including both the front and back derailleurs, as Shimano is one of the top gear manufacturers.

Speed and manoeuvrability can be improved, but not to the extent you’d expect from a more specialised bike with only 8 gears.

Many novice riders find it advantageous to have fewer gears since it allows them to practise effective gearing techniques without the hassles of a more advanced drivetrain.

Brake

Using the brakes, we return to the FX 2’s strong points. A basic-level brake is standard on most hybrid motorcycles in this price range.

Lever brakes are completely functional, but they aren’t as good in wet circumstances and can be a bit more unpredictable than other types. As a result, inferior types of level brakes are more likely to fail and require frequent pad replacements.

Tektro’s hydraulic disc brakes are the reason for this model’s decision by Trek. In rainy weather, the brakes are more reliable, and they also provide the stop-on-a-dime control you need for an urban bike, especially a commuter one.

For the optimum performance and longevity, we recommend that you have your bike’s brakes checked out as soon as it arrives. For the FX 2, we have no issues regarding this design decision.

Is the Trek FX 2 Worth It?

Yes, the $779.99 price tag on the 2022 Trek FX 2 Disc is well worth it. To get the Trek FX 3 Disc, you’ll need to fork over an extra $150. Carbon fork absorbs road vibrations, as do updated components in the groupset. All Trek FX models are excellent, so you can’t go wrong.

FX 2 Disc motorcycles are available in two colour options for the 2022 model year. In the first place, the Trek FX model has always come in Satin Lithium Gray, Trek’s usual colour option. The second colour option is pure savagery. The colour is Satin Viper Red, and it’s stunning in person.

For two reasons, I’m a fan of the Viper Red. Aside from that, it enhances the bike’s aesthetics and makes it appear more agile. The color’s ability to stand out is another important factor. This Viper Red motorcycle is sure to catch the eye of onlookers. They are less likely to run you over if they can see you. Which, as you may have guessed, is fantastic!

Who Is The Trek FX 2 Good For?

For those who want a high-quality ride without having to compromise on comfort, the Trek FX 2 is the ideal choice. Anyone who has never ridden a road bike will find this bike extremely fast. It’s a decent long-distance bike with beefier tyres.

Trek’s FX 2 offers commuters a variety of rack and fender mounting options, as well as a wide range of storage options for touring.

For a single bike to fill so many niches, it is a rare feat. It’s possible that our Trek FX 2 review is the first of its kind to cover road biking, fitness biking, gravel riding, as well as enjoyment. On the FX 2, all of these are a tonne of fun and feel great. Mountain biking is the only type of riding that the FX 2 isn’t suitable for.

What Kind Of Bike Is The Trek FX 2?

It is a fitness/hybrid bike, and the Trek FX 2 is one. Hybrid bikes are basically any type of bicycle that doesn’t fit into a certain category like a road, mountain or cruiser type bicycle. In contrast to regular road bikes, fitness hybrids have flat handlebars instead of the drop bars found on most road cycles.

There are a variety of terrains that fitness hybrid bikes can be used on. In addition to being wonderful for commuting, flat bars may be used to create a fantastic gravel bike. It’s a bike that can do it all, but it’s not the best at any one thing.

My Trek FX 2 had two sets of wheels for a long time. The OEM wheelset came with 35mm tyres, so I swapped them out for some slightly more aggressive 32mm road tyres that I had on a set of 40mm gravel tyres. After a while, tyre upgrades weren’t enough, so I began to purchase newer bikes. Despite this, I’m still attached to my Trek FX 2.

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